Nikon AF-S 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR

Paradox

The Nikon AF-S Zoom-Nikkor VR 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED is a paradox on blog do zack. An unique zoom lens made for FX cameras, it can take the place of virtually all lenses on a kit, from the 28mm wide angle, good for indoor architecture and landscapes, all the way to the super telephoto 300mm, great to play with the perspective compression of faraway subjects. On a site designed to help you decide “which lens to buy?”, the 28-300mm could easily be the only answer you’ll ever need, from beginners who still don’t have the need for a high performance, large aperture specialised prime; to anyone looking for a do-it-all, flexible lens, like travellers.

“Galeria True Rouge, 2006” with the Nikon D750 + AF-S 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED; a sequence of focal lengths from wide to telephoto.

A part of the AF-S G family, it’s reasonably well built and packed with Nikon’s technology. A SWM built-in focusing motor makes it compatible with every digital SLR ever made. The VRII optical stabilisation promises up to 3.5 stops of correction, mandatory for telephoto distances. And three aspherical and two ED glasses keeps the image quality acceptable for such an extreme 10.7x zoom ratio, with a sub-US$1000 price tag. But can it live by its promises as the perfect all-arounder? Or is it too much to ask from a single zoom lens? Let’s find out! Nice reading.



BUILD QUALITY

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR

At 11.6 x 8.3cm closed, and 24.9 x11cm open with the lens hood attached; all at 800g, the AF-S VR 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED is a heavy giant in trend with other “specialty” zooms. It’s big without being exaggerated, much closer to “consumer” lenses like the AF-S VR 24-120mm f/4G ED (10.4 x 8.4cm at 710g) than professional tools like the 70-200mm f/2.8. It easily fits in bags designed to carry a single lens and camera, and can be a nice walk-around lens to spend the weekend, without the hustle of various equipment. With a mix of plastics and metal, the first on the outer barrel and the second on the mount and internal barrel, it’s well put together for a large zoom.

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR

In your hands it fits comfortably around all fingers, with a frontal zoom ring and rear focus ring, side buttons for AF/VR/LOCK operations, the standard layout for most telephoto Zoom-Nikkors. From 28mm to 300mm it smoothly extends without rotating the barrels, much smoothly than the half-priced AF-S 70-300mm we’ve tested recently. That all plastic lens was hard to the touch, but this 28-300mm isn’t; proof the inner threads and bearings are indeed metal, as you can feel on the colder frontal cam at your finger tips. It does have a minimal play when shaken, but not by much as it could be damaged. It’s decent for US$949 lens, and can definitely last a lifetime if well kept.

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR

Inside the SWM AF-S motor is silent and smooth, with an operation closer to higher end pieces. It’s much quieter than entry-level, large aperture primes like the AF-S DX 35mm f/1.8G or 50mm f/1.8G; and makes a high pitch, almost “sonic” like sound similar to the Micro-Nikkor 105mm f/2.8G. But it’s not the fastest and can be a little cumbersome for action shooting, especially if the focusing position is too far off where it’s supposed to be. It can take a whole second from infinity to 0.5m, and it gets slower if the camera has to hunt for focus. At least it’s accurate and I have no out of focus shots, except when I did something wrong like shooting close subjects, wide open, at the telephoto end, without holding my breath, slightly moving the very thin depth of field.



Nikon AF-S Nikkor 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR

The VRII is well implemented and again much quieter than lesser lenses. My AF-S 70-300mm copy makes a loud click when the module activates, and requires careful timing before half-pressing the shutter button. This AF-S 28-300mm keeps the “must be pointed at the subject before activating” operation, but gets rid of the noise. The declared 3.5 stops compensation indeed works, but requires you to aim at your subject before engaging the VR mechanism; lagging a bit or not working at all if done otherwise. I didn’t specifically used it for reducing shutter speeds as I was using AUTO-ISO and kept it at 1/100, but the VR was great to frame the shot at the telephoto end.

“Heliconia" with the Nikon D750 + AF-S 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED at f/5.6 1/25 ISO 400 @ 300mm.

“Heliconia” with the Nikon D750 + AF-S 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED at f/5.6 1/25 ISO 400 @ 300mm.

100% crop, the VRII module made a great job at stabilising the frame for a 1/25 shutter speed at the telephoto end.

100% crop, the VRII module made a great job at stabilising the frame for a 1/25 shutter speed at the telephoto end.

At the front the non-rotating ø77mm filter thread is plastic and big, compatible with other telephoto lenses. The included lens hood attaches to its own thread, and the petal shape seems designed to work better at the wider end. At the top the distance window is small but clear, and the manual focusing ring shows some play between the ring movement and the inner group engaging. It sports full time manual operation but it’s never really necessary, as the AF-S does a great job at auto focusing. And at the rear the metal mount surrounds a tiny rear element, not compatible with extenders. There’s a rubber gasket against the elements, but nothing is declared about real weather resistance. I did see major dust speckles inside my copy, so beware.

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR

Overall the AF-S 28-300mm is well put together and handles much better than some intermediary zooms, especially the AF-S 70-300mm. The 28-300mm zoom ring is much smoother, although it suffers from some zoom creep when carried on your shoulders; that’s why the LOCK switch is there. Its SWM won’t win any awards for speed but it’s accurate even under low light, at least with the D750. And the VRII lags if you’re not perfectly aiming your subject before activating it, besides the great 3.5 stops compensation. It’s a very nice lens to have and works like a proper US$1000 equipment. But only the images will prove if it’s good enough to substitute a whole set of primes.



IMAGE QUALITY

“Galeria Miguel Rio Branco, 2010” at f/5.6 1/200 ISO3200 @ 32mm.

“Galeria Miguel Rio Branco, 2010” at f/5.6 1/200 ISO3200 @ 32mm.

All photos with the Nikon D750. Raw files available at Patreon.

With a complex 19 elements in 14 groups formula, three aspherical and two ED glasses, plus Nikon’s Super Integrated Coating, the AF-S 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G pushes the boundary of what Nikkor can deliver on the FX format, following the steps of the highly regarded AF-S DX 18-200mm. It’s a very difficult focal range to achieve quality, and I’ve got to admit I wasn’t really expecting miracles from a 10.7x zoom. But honestly I was surprised by the results.

“Galeria Adriana Varejão, 2008” at f/5 1/250 ISO400 @ 82mm.

“Galeria Adriana Varejão, 2008” at f/5 1/250 ISO400 @ 82mm.

Even wide open at f/3.5 28mm, f/3.8 35mm, f/4.5 50mm, f/5 70mm, f/5.3 105 and f/5.6 from 200mm to 300mm, I’m pleased with the results from such a flexible lens. Ok, ok, it’s not the sharpest at the edges and the contrast benefits from some software boosting in post, but honestly, what lens doesn’t? It’s one of those cases of cost/benefit ratio with a flirt on nice results: you get a complete set of focal lengths from a single lens that screams creativity, but you won’t get the sharpest files for clinical results. The AF-S 28-300mm just works as the images are colourful, the details are well rendered, and, again, the photos are not absolutely awful as to not recommend it completely.



“Heliconia II” at f/5.6 1/100 ISO500 @ 300mm.

“Heliconia II” at f/5.6 1/100 ISO500 @ 300mm.

100% crop, the details are acceptable at the longer end.

100% crop, the details are acceptable at the longer end.

“Heliconias” at f/5.6 1/30 ISO400 @ 200mm; colours, colours, colours…

“Heliconias” at f/5.6 1/30 ISO400 @ 200mm; colours, colours, colours…

“Tibouchina” at f/5.6 1/250 ISO200 @ 300mm.

“Tibouchina” at f/5.6 1/250 ISO200 @ 300mm.

100% crop, at close focusing distances the image quality suffers from the magnifying effect.

100% crop, at close focusing distances the image quality suffers from the magnifying effect.

“Tibouchina II” at f/5.6 1/800 ISO200 @ 300mm.

“Tibouchina II” at f/5.6 1/800 ISO200 @ 300mm.

100% crop, but it can more than handle large prints.

100% crop, but it can more than handle large prints.

“True Rouge, 1997” at f/5.6 1/200 ISO800 @ 28mm.

“True Rouge, 1997” at f/5.6 1/200 ISO800 @ 28mm.

100% crop, at the wide end the details are better when stopped down.

100% crop, at the wide end the details are better when stopped down.

100% crop, even at the corner of the frame I would it’s acceptable.

100% crop, even at the corners I would say it’s acceptable.

“True Rouge, 1997 II” at f/5.6 1/200 ISO3200 @ 55mm.

“True Rouge, 1997 II” at f/5.6 1/200 ISO3200 @ 55mm.

100% crop, the performance is nowhere near a prime lens, but for that you wouldn’t buy a 10x zoom, would you?

100% crop, the performance is nowhere near a prime lens, but for that you wouldn’t buy a 10x zoom, would you?

“True Rouge, 1997 III” at f/5.6 1/200 ISO2500 @ 28mm.

“True Rouge, 1997 III” at f/5.6 1/200 ISO2500 @ 28mm.

100% crop, it can impress at 28mm and one or two stops closed down.

100% crop, it can impress at 28mm and one or two stops closed down.

“True Rouge, 1997 IV” at f/5.6 1/200 ISO3200 @ 230mm.

“True Rouge, 1997 IV” at f/5.6 1/200 ISO3200 @ 230mm.

100% crop, back wide open at the telephoto end, the details are smeared between the 19 glass elements.

100% crop, back wide open at the telephoto end, the details are smeared between the 19 glass elements.

“True Rouge, 1997 V” at f/5.6 1/200 ISO2200 @ 300mm.

“True Rouge, 1997 V” at f/5.6 1/200 ISO2200 @ 300mm.

100% crop, it’s near impossible to see anything wide open, at the telephoto, near short focusing distances.

100% crop, it’s near impossible to see anything wide open, at the telephoto, near short focusing distances.

“Cooking Crystals, 2010” at f/4.2 1/100 ISO1250 @ 44mm.

“Cooking Crystals, 2010” at f/4.2 1/100 ISO1250 @ 44mm.

100% crop, better sharpness would undoubtedly be achieved with a prime lens.

100% crop, better sharpness would undoubtedly be achieved with a prime lens.

“Inside out, upside down, 1995” at f/4 1/100 ISO1100 @ 42mm.

“Inside out, upside down, 1995” at f/4 1/100 ISO1100 @ 42mm.

100% crop, some good detailing for the standard focal length.

100% crop, some good detailing for the standard focal length.

“Inside out, upside down, 1995 II” at f/5 1/100 ISO1600 @ 85mm.

“Inside out, upside down, 1995 II” at f/5 1/100 ISO1600 @ 85mm.

100% crop, would be much, much sharper with a prime lens.

100% crop, would be much, much sharper with a prime lens.

“Edward Krasinski, Sem Título, 2004” at f/4.5 1/100 ISO400 @ 28mm; some vignetting near the largest aperture.

“Edward Krasinski, Sem Título, 2004” at f/4.5 1/100 ISO400 @ 28mm; some vignetting near the largest aperture.

“Galeria Praça” at f/4.5 1/125 ISO400 @ 36mm.

“Galeria Praça” at f/4.5 1/125 ISO400 @ 36mm.

100% crop, sharp contrast edges.

100% crop, sharp contrast edges.

“Galeria Claudia Andujar, 2015”, at f/4.8 1/100 ISO450 @ 62mm; a vignette that works for architecture shots.

“Galeria Claudia Andujar, 2015”, at f/4.8 1/100 ISO450 @ 62mm; a vignette that works for architecture shots.

“Fotos” at f/4.5 1/100 ISO12800 @ 56mm.

“Touching III with collage III, 2013” at f/4.5 1/100 ISO12800 @ 56mm.

100% crop, a nearly flawless contrast wide open.

100% crop, a nearly flawless contrast wide open.

As much as I’ve tried to make it look bad, the AF-S 28-300mm also delivered good results when stopped down at f/8. The corners are acceptable throughout the zoom range if you can keep your subject within the limits of the depth of field, which is very thin at the telephoto end. The photos were a paradox as I went to Inhotim, one of the largest sites of contemporary art in the world, and saw about four photo exhibitions on a single day. And guess what: none showcased images that required corner to corner sharpness, and they’re considered masterpieces. So take raw optical performance as an extra, not as a request for good photographs, and the 28-300mm just works.

“Brumadinho” at f/8 1/200 ISO100 @ 300mm.

“Brumadinho” at f/8 1/200 ISO100 @ 300mm.

100% crop, the telephoto is never really sharp, but take into consideration the distance and some atmospheric distortion.

100% crop, the telephoto is never really sharp, but take into consideration the distance and some atmospheric distortion.

“Brumadinho II” at f/8 1/160 ISO100 @ 300mm.

“Brumadinho II” at f/8 1/160 ISO100 @ 300mm.

100% crop, but there are enough details for cropping or prints.

100% crop, but there are enough details for cropping or prints.

“Alto do Mirante” at f/8 1/320 ISO100 @ 70mm.

“Alto do Mirante” at f/8 1/320 ISO100 @ 70mm.

100% crop, right before the telephoto range, it’s quite sharp for a zoom.

100% crop, right before the telephoto range, it’s quite sharp for a zoom.

“Alto do Mirante II” at f/8 1/400 ISO100 @ 105mm.

“Alto do Mirante II” at f/8 1/400 ISO100 @ 105mm.

100% crop, very good performance at the optimised aperture.

100% crop, very good performance at the optimised aperture.

“Sunset” at f/8 1/80 1/100 ISO100 @ 250mm; excellent colours and contrast.

“Sunset” at f/8 1/80 1/100 ISO100 @ 250mm; excellent colours and contrast.

“Sunset II” at f/8 1/200 ISO100 112mm.

“Sunset II” at f/8 1/200 ISO100 112mm.

“Sunset III” at f/8 1/320 ISO100 @ 300mm.

“Sunset III” at f/8 1/320 ISO100 @ 300mm.

“Galeria Claudia Andujar, 2015 II” at f/8 1/100 ISO1100 @ 28mm.

“Galeria Claudia Andujar, 2015 II” at f/8 1/100 ISO1100 @ 28mm.

100% crop, acceptable contrast in backlit situations.

100% crop, acceptable contrast in backlit situations.

“Sonic Pavillion, 2009” at f/8 1/250 ISO200 @ 28mm.

“Sonic Pavillion, 2009” at f/8 1/250 ISO200 @ 28mm.

100% crop, sharp details for editorial work.

100% crop, sharp details for editorial work.

“Sonic Pavillion, 2009 II” at f/8 1/250 ISO200 @ 28mm.

“Sonic Pavillion, 2009 II” at f/8 1/250 ISO200 @ 28mm.

100% crop, very fine details for most uses.

100% crop, very fine details for most uses.

“Sonic Pavillion, 2009 III” at f/8 1/320 ISO200 @ 28mm.

“Sonic Pavillion, 2009 III” at f/8 1/320 ISO200 @ 28mm.

100% crop, the wide end once again proves it’s the sharpest setting.

100% crop, the wide end once again proves it’s the sharpest setting.

“Sonic Pavillion, 2009 IV” at f/7.1 1/1000 ISO200 @ 90mm.

“Sonic Pavillion, 2009 IV” at f/7.1 1/1000 ISO200 @ 90mm.

100% crop, notice how the resolution drops at the mid range.

100% crop, notice how the resolution drops at the mid range.

“Invenção da cor, Penetrável Magic Square #5, De Luxe, 1977” at f/8 1/100 ISO220 @ 180mm.

“Invenção da cor, Penetrável Magic Square #5, De Luxe, 1977” at f/8 1/100 ISO220 @ 180mm.

100% crop, a good center performance for the medium telephoto.

100% crop, a good center performance for the medium telephoto.

“Plant” at f/8 1/50 ISO100 @ 92mm.

“Plant” at f/8 1/50 ISO100 @ 92mm.

100% crop, sharp and contrasty center frame.

100% crop, sharp and contrasty center frame.

“Plant II” at f/8 1/200 ISO400 @ 62mm.

“Plant II” at f/8 1/200 ISO400 @ 62mm.

100% crop, phenomenal center performance.

100% crop, phenomenal center performance.

100% crop, and the corner follows at reasonable sharpness.

100% crop, and the corner follows at reasonable sharpness.

“Plant III” at f/8 1/125 ISO400 @ 28mm.

“Plant III” at f/8 1/125 ISO400 @ 28mm.

100% crop, textures and details just work at the center wide angle.

100% crop, textures and details just work at the center wide angle.

100% crop, but the corners might look under a magnifying lens.

100% crop, but the corners might look under a magnifying lens.

“Canto” at f/8 1/100 ISO6400 @ 72mm.

“Canto” at f/8 1/100 ISO6400 @ 72mm.

100% crop, nice details for mundane subjects.

100% crop, nice details for mundane subjects.

“SP” at f/29 189” ISO100 @ 105mm.

“SP” at f/29 189” ISO100 @ 105mm.

100% crop, the nine blade aperture refuses to render nice light stars.

100% crop, the nine blade aperture refuses to render nice light stars.

“SP” at f/29 188” ISO100 @ 250mm.

“SP” at f/29 188” ISO100 @ 250mm.

100% crop, again, a prime lens would be better for light stars.

100% crop, again, a prime lens would be better for light stars.

Those interested in aberrations will be glad to know the AF-S 28-300mm show loads of them. The geometric distortion if very pronounced at 28mm, with a noticeable bulge around the edges, gone at 35mm; and back as pincushion from 50mm to 300mm. Most DSLRs can correct it in camera with the EXPEED processor, and you’re good to go even in motion during video recordings. Chromatic aberrations are present with heavy lateral lines around contrast edges, visible in virtually every zoom lens I’ve ever used (except maybe the Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM). And some axial aberration can happen at close focusing distances, that looks like a magnifying glass at the minimum focusing distance at 300mm, with a ratio of 0.32x for macro shooting. 

“Invenção da cor, Penetrável Magic Square #5, De Luxe, 1977 II” at f/8 1/200 ISO100 @ 28mm; a very noticeable bulge at the wider end.

“Invenção da cor, Penetrável Magic Square #5, De Luxe, 1977 II” at f/8 1/200 ISO100 @ 28mm; a very noticeable bulge at the wider end.

“Invenção da cor, Penetrável Magic Square #5, De Luxe, 1977 III” at f/8 1/160 ISO100 @ 40mm; slight pincushion at the standard length.

“Invenção da cor, Penetrável Magic Square #5, De Luxe, 1977 III” at f/8 1/160 ISO100 @ 40mm; slight pincushion at the standard length.

“Invenção da cor, Penetrável Magic Square #5, De Luxe, 1977” IV” at f/8 1/160 ISO100 @ 62mm; more pincushion at the end of the standard.

“Invenção da cor, Penetrável Magic Square #5, De Luxe, 1977” IV” at f/8 1/160 ISO100 @ 62mm; more pincushion at the end of the standard.

“Pintura Velha, 2013” at f/4.5 1/100 ISO2000 @ 28mm; barrel distortion at the wider eng.

“Pintura Velha, 2013” at f/4.5 1/100 ISO2000 @ 28mm; barrel distortion at the wider end.

“Pintura Velha, 2013 II” at f/4.5 1/100 ISO2800 @ 48mm; it turn to pincushion at the standard length.

“Pintura Velha, 2013 II” at f/4.5 1/100 ISO2800 @ 48mm; it turn to pincushion at the standard length.

“Pintura Velha, 2013 III” at f/5 1/100 ISO4000 @ 85mm; more pincushion at the short telephoto.

“Pintura Velha, 2013 III” at f/5 1/100 ISO4000 @ 85mm; more pincushion at the short telephoto.

“Pintura Velha, 2013 IV” at f/5.6 1/100 ISO4500 @ 135mm; pincushion at telephoto.

“Pintura Velha, 2013 IV” at f/5.6 1/100 ISO4500 @ 135mm; pincushion at telephoto.

“Pintura Velha, 2013 V” at f/5.6 1/100 ISO6400 @ 300mm; and pincushion at the end of the range.

“Pintura Velha, 2013 V” at f/5.6 1/100 ISO6400 @ 300mm; and pincushion at the end of the range.

“Fotos série Maciel, 1979” at f/3.5 1/200 ISO7200 @ 28mm; it can be annoying to shoot indoor architecture, but easily fixable in post.

“Fotos série Maciel, 1979” at f/3.5 1/200 ISO7200 @ 28mm; it can be annoying to shoot indoor architecture, but easily fixable in post.

“Galeria Claudia Andujar, 2015 III” at f/3.5 1/100 ISO1000 @ 28mm; but also easy to hide depending on your angles.

“Galeria Claudia Andujar, 2015 III” at f/3.5 1/100 ISO1000 @ 28mm; but also easy to hide depending on your angles.

“Galeria Claudia Andujar, 2015 IV” at f/3.5 1/100 ISO800 @ 28mm; near invisible barrel distortion due to the composition lines.

“Galeria Claudia Andujar, 2015 IV” at f/3.5 1/100 ISO800 @ 28mm; near invisible barrel distortion due to the composition lines.

“Galeria Adriana Varejão, 2008 II” at f/8 1/200 ISO400 @ 58mm; invisible pincushion if the straight lines are at the center axis.

“Galeria Adriana Varejão, 2008 II” at f/8 1/200 ISO400 @ 58mm; invisible pincushion if the straight lines are at the center axis.

“Galeria Adriana Varejão, 2008 III” at f/8 1/320 ISO400 @ 28mm.

“Galeria Adriana Varejão, 2008 III” at f/8 1/320 ISO400 @ 28mm.

“Galeria Adriana Varejão, 2008 IV” at f/6.3 1/250 ISO400 @ 28mm; distorted ceiling at the top of the frame.

“Galeria Adriana Varejão, 2008 IV” at f/6.3 1/250 ISO400 @ 28mm; distorted ceiling at the top of the frame.

“Galeria Adriana Varejão, 2008 V” at f/8 1/100 ISO3600 @ 32mm; zero distortion at the end of wide angle.

“Galeria Adriana Varejão, 2008 V” at f/8 1/100 ISO3600 @ 32mm; zero distortion at the end of wide angle.

“De Lama Lâmina, 2004” at f/8 1/50 ISO200 @ 28mm.

“De Lama Lâmina, 2004” at f/8 1/50 ISO200 @ 28mm.

100% crop, lack of resolution and loads of lateral chromatic aberration.

100% crop, lack of resolution and loads of lateral chromatic aberration.

“De Lama Lâmina, 2004 II” at f/8 1/1000 ISO200 @ 70mm.

“De Lama Lâmina, 2004 II” at f/8 1/1000 ISO200 @ 70mm.

100% crop, lateral CAs are not a problem for low contrast edges.

100% crop, lateral CAs are not a problem for low contrast edges.

“De Lama Lâmina, 2004 III” at f/8 1/25 ISO400 @ 28mm.

“De Lama Lâmina, 2004 III” at f/8 1/25 ISO400 @ 28mm.

100% crop, very heavy lateral aberration at highly manipulated file.

100% crop, very heavy lateral aberration at highly manipulated file.

“De Lama Lâmina, 2004 IV” at f/8 1/30 ISO400 @ 28mm.

“De Lama Lâmina, 2004 IV” at f/8 1/30 ISO400 @ 28mm.

100% crop, contrast edges and windows are always a challenge for zoom lenses, but…

100% crop, contrast edges and windows are always a challenge for zoom lenses, but…

“De Lama Lâmina, 2004 V” at f/8 1/15 ISO640 @ 28mm.

“De Lama Lâmina, 2004 V” at f/8 1/15 ISO640 @ 28mm.

100% crop, after a single click in Adobe’s Camera Raw, the lateral CA is perfectly corrected.

100% crop, after a single click in Adobe’s Camera Raw, the lateral CA is perfectly corrected.

“Lago” at f/8 1/250 ISO100 @ 28mm.

“Lago” at f/8 1/250 ISO100 @ 28mm.

100% crop, colourful edges even on organic subject like tree tops.

100% crop, colourful edges even on organic subject like tree tops.

“Heliconia III” at f/5.6 1/40 ISO300 @ 300mm; 0.32x minimum focusing distance macro.

“Heliconia III” at f/5.6 1/40 ISO300 @ 300mm; 0.32x minimum focusing distance macro.

100% crop, the sharpness is very poor, nowhere near a dedicated macro lens as expected.

100% crop, the sharpness is very poor, nowhere near a dedicated macro lens as expected.

“Tibouchina III” at f/8 1/250 ISO200 @ 300mm.

“Tibouchina III” at f/8 1/250 ISO200 @ 300mm.

100% crop, stopping down make the center “macro” performance fair for such a complex lens.

100% crop, stopping down make the center “macro” performance fair for such a complex lens.

100% crop, but the magnifying glass blue-blur edge is undeniably a poor’s man macro flaw.

100% crop, but the magnifying glass blue-blur edge is undeniably a poor’s man macro flaw.

Finally the bokeh is interesting at the longer wide open end, when the shallow depth of field isolates your subject. The nine blade aperture is not exactly circular when stopped down, nor it generates good light stars for night exposures. But the out of focus areas can be pronounced, blending the background for colour composition of flowers and other smaller objects, and one of the uses of the telephoto. The highlights are not the smoothest as you can see the light path throughout circles and other “bacteria” noise, but it’s usable for most situations.

“Plant IV” at f/8 1/100 ISO400 @ 300mm.

“Plant IV” at f/8 1/100 ISO400 @ 300mm.

100% crop, first I can’t complain about this lens sharpness…

100% crop, first I can’t complain about this lens sharpness…

 100% crop, and second I can’t complaint about its abilities to melt the background away at the telephoto end.

100% crop, and second I can’t complaint about its abilities to melt the background away at the telephoto end.

“Plant V” at f/5.6 1/200 ISO1100 @ 300mm.

“Plant V” at f/5.6 1/200 ISO1100 @ 300mm.

100% crop, again, acceptable sharpness wide open at the frame center.

100% crop, again, acceptable sharpness wide open at the frame center.

100% crop, good bokeh at farther distances, weird on the close background.

100% crop, good bokeh at farther distances, weird on the close background.

“Plant VI” at f/5.6 1/250 ISO100 @ 300mm; is that some “swirly” bokeh?

“Plant VI” at f/5.6 1/250 ISO100 @ 300mm; is that some “swirly” bokeh?

100% crop, neon tubes bokeh at closer background subjects.

100% crop, neon tubes bokeh at closer background subjects.

“Flower” at f/5.6 1/1000 ISO400 @ 300mm; bokeh balls!

“Flower” at f/5.6 1/1000 ISO400 @ 300mm; bokeh balls!

100% crop, but not very smooth ones; but who cares?

100% crop, but not very smooth ones; but who cares?

“Flower II” at f/5.6 1/800 ISO400 @ 300mm.

“Flower II” at f/5.6 1/800 ISO400 @ 300mm.

100% crop, fair center sharpness for close focusing distance.

100% crop, fair center sharpness for close focusing distance.

100% crop, with plenty of details for prints.

100% crop, with plenty of details for prints.

“Brick wall” at f/5.3 1/200 ISO400 @ 92mm; mere bokeh experiment.

“Brick wall” at f/5.3 1/200 ISO400 @ 92mm; mere bokeh experiment.

100% crop, nice texture details.

100% crop, nice texture details.

“Out of focus” at f/4.8 13” ISO100 @ 62mm; notice the zoom “bacteria” noise.

“Out of focus” at f/4.8 13” ISO100 @ 62mm; notice the zoom “bacteria” noise.

“Out of focus” at f/4.8 13” ISO100 @ 62mm; both apertures aren’t really rounded nor 100% smooth.

“Out of focus” at f/4.8 13” ISO100 @ 62mm; both apertures aren’t really rounded nor 100% smooth.

COMPARED TO: AF-S 70-300MM F/4.5-5.6G

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 IF ED VR

The Nikon AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED is a US$499 alternative for telephoto shooters who don’t need the tight build and high performance of better US$1899+ zooms. A popular choice among amateurs and low budget professionals, sometime it gets competition from the all-arounder 28-300mm that reaches the same telephoto end. However both featuring an AF-S motor and a second generation VR II, there’s no way around the laws of physics: optically the 4.3x 70-300mm is a much better performer than the 10.7x 28-300mm. (click for larger)

"SPD" @ 70mm

“SPD” @ 70mm

Wide open the AF-S 28-300mm just can’t compare to the 70-300mm: the details are smeared near the edges and it looks darker.

At the center the AF-S 70-300mm is near flawless wide open while the 28-300mm lags quite a bit behind.

Stopping down helps the 28-300mm, but the AF-S 70-300mm remais vastly superior.

"SPDII" at 300mm; notice the very dark corners with the AF-S 28-300mm.

“SPDII” at 300mm; notice the very dark corners with the AF-S 28-300mm.

At the telephoto end the AF-S can’t compete; the much simpler 70-300mm is also the best.

I would call the AF-S 28-300mm acceptable, but the AF-S 70-300mm is a much better tool for the job.

Near the edges the 70-300mm is almost as good as prime lens, but the 28-300mm lags behind by a mile.

At minimum focusing distances on the telephoto end the AF-S 28-300mm is also much wider than the AF-S 70-300mm. The ultra zoom looks like a 150mm lens at the 300mm setting and will make a difference for those shooting insects, flowers and other details. At infinity they look the same.

"Details" with the AF-S 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED at f/5.6 1/100 ISO1000 @ 300mm.

“Details” with the AF-S 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED at f/5.6 1/100 ISO1000 @ 300mm.

"Details" with the AF-S 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED at f/5.6 1/100 ISO1000 @ 300mm; a much tighter frame.

“Details” with the AF-S 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED at f/5.6 1/100 ISO1000 @ 300mm; a much tighter frame.

"Details" with the AF-S 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED at f/5.6 1/100 ISO1000 @ 170mm; trying to render the same focal length as the AF-S 28-300mm

“Details” with the AF-S 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED at f/5.6 1/100 ISO1000 @ 170mm; trying to render the same focal length as the AF-S 28-300mm

VERDICT

Honestly the AF-S 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED was the first ultra-zoom lens I’ve ever tested on a full frame camera and I’m pleased with the results. The flexibility far surpasses its optical flaws and even those are small enough that some post processing make the files pop. The build quality is great for a simple, easy to use zoom-cam design, with minimum wobbling of the barrels and metal in the right places. It’s heavy and made to balance with full frame cameras, but nonetheless a pleasure to use. The truth is in it’s images and, I’m sorry to disappoint you, it delivers. It might not be a top performer in raw resolution and contrast, but that’s not the idea. To be an always-with-you-lens to deliver great focal range and images, it surely reaches its goals. Have fun with it!